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Occasionally I wandered in where I was not wanted and gave truthful answers.
Sometimes I even did it deliberately. A little disruption now can prevent disaster later.

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My comments on the “Billy Graham rule”

I used to think that this was a silly thing Christians used to hide their own insecurity. And if I had my druthers, I'd put this is a caution box with the red banner and be done with it.

Yeah. I can't do that anymore.

Like it or not, we live in the age of #MeToo. One inevitable result is the increase of false accusations of harassment and rape.

No, not every accusation is false. But a significant number are. Women have been handed a huge political power that no one wants to morally deny them. As long as false accusations are tolerated, even encouraged as the cost of setting right past wrongs, there is a huge temptation.

These days, an odd looking man is assumed to be a predator of women and children. If the man is unmarried, even more so. So if I am meeting someone for the first time, it's better with witnesses. If it's only going to be a casual relationship, there should be witnesses each and every time.

This means holding women at a distance. I have to watch myself. I have to watch my language. No matter what she is wearing, no matter how she looks, I can't allow myself to look too close for too long. I have to treat a woman as if she is less than fully human. As if my every move could utterly destroy her. As if she is unable to resist the corruption of my maleness.

And I do not dare be alone with her.

I don't like it. I think it's a stupid rule. But it's practical.
— NeoWayland, Billy Graham rule
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“The Renaissance: Was it a Thing? - Crash Course World History #22”


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Gibbs Rule #11

When the job is done, walk away.
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“Change your perspective.”

The WebTree itself is the wyrd or orgone weave that permeates and connects everything. Depending on perspective, it might be a web, a tree of life, a labyrinth, or found in the curves of a Celtic design. Understanding the connections and the tensions are the key. Sometimes the polarities and connections are obvious.

Key concepts include cycles, dynamic balances, flux points, the Wheel of the Year, weirds and the Knot.
— NeoWayland, Webtree
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“If anything can go wrong, it will.”

If anything can go wrong, it will — and in the most annoying manner possible.
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Keep a notebook

Keep a notebook. Travel with it, eat with it, sleep with it. Slap into it every stray thought that flutters up into your brain. Cheap paper is less perishable than gray matter, and lead pencil markings endure longer than memory.
— Jack London
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Unexpected goddesses

“Let It Be Flash Mob for United Girls of the World”

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Gibbs Rule #9

Never go anywhere without a knife.
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“Anything can be a person.”

Any phenomenon may be considered to be alive and to have a personality, that is, to “be” an entity or being, and may be effectively dealt with thusly.
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“Columbus, de Gama, and Zheng He! 15th Century Mariners. Crash Course: World History #21”

“In which John Green teaches you about the beginning of the so-called Age of Discovery. You've probably heard of Christopher Columbus, who "discovered" America in 1492, but what about Vasco da Gama? How about Zheng He? Columbus gets a bad rap from many modern historians, but it turns out he was pretty important as far as the history of the world goes. That said, he wasn't the only pioneer plying the seas in the 1400s. In Portugal, Vasco da Gama was busy integrating Europe into the Indian Ocean Trade by sailing around Africa. Chinese admiral Zheng He was also traveling far and wide in the largest wooden ships ever built. Columbus, whether portrayed as hero or villain, is usually credited as the great sailor of the 15th century, but he definitely wasn't the only contender. What better way to settle this question than with a knock-down, drag-out, no holds barred, old-fashioned battle royal? We were going to make it a cage match, but welding is EXPENSIVE.”

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Seven Principles of Leave No Trace

I should warn you, reading the article that prompted this entry is depressing.

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“Russia, the Kievan Rus, and the Mongols: Crash Course World History #20”

“In which John Green teaches you how Russia evolved from a loose amalgamation of medieval principalities known as the Kievan Rus into the thriving democracy we know today. As you can imagine, there were a few bumps along the road. It turns out, our old friends the Mongols had quite a lot to do with unifying Russia. In yet another example of how surprisingly organized nomadic raiders can be, the Mongols brought the Kievan Rus together under a single leadership, and concentrated power in Moscow. This set the stage for the various Ivans (the Great and the Terrible) to throw off the yoke and form a pan-Russian nation ruled by an autocratic leader. More than 500 years later, we still have autocratic leadership in Russia. All this, plus a rundown of some of our favorite atrocities of Ivan the Terrible, and a visit from Putin!”

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Gibbs Rule #8

Never take anything for granted.
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“You live in your cosmos and I’ll live in mine.”

Every sentient being lives in and quite possibly creates a unique universe which can never be 100% identical to that lived in by another.
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Rocky river

The gentleman just might be a little over tanned.

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“Venice and the Ottoman Empire: Crash Course World History #19”

“In which John Green discusses the strange and mutually beneficial relationship between a republic, the citystate of Venice, and an Empire, the Ottomans--and how studying history can help you to be a better boyfriend and/or girlfriend. Together, the Ottoman Empire and Venice grew wealthy by facilitating trade: The Venetians had ships and nautical expertise; the Ottomans had access to many of the most valuable goods in the world, especially pepper and grain. Working together across cultural and religious divides, they both become very rich, and the Ottomans became one of the most powerful political entities in the world. We also discuss how economic realities can overcome religious and political differences (in this case between Muslims and Christians), the doges of Venice, the sultans of the Ottoman empire, the janissaries and so-called slave aristocracy of the Ottoman Empire, and how money and knowledge from the Islamic world helped fuel and fund the European Renaissance. Also, there's a They Might Be Giants joke.”

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“Int'l Commerce, Snorkeling Camels, and The Indian Ocean Trade: Crash Course World History #18”

“In which John Green teaches you the history of the Indian Ocean Trade. John weaves a tale of swashbuckling adventure, replete with trade in books, ivory, and timber. Along the way, John manages to cover advances in seafaring technology, just how the monsoons work, and there's even a disembowelment for you Fangoria fans.”

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Therapeutic

There’s something therapeutic about nudity… Take away the Gucci or Levi’s and we’re all the same.
— Kevin Bacon
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Gibbs Rule #6

Never say you're sorry. It's a sign of weakness.
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Not the thing

The map is not the territory, the word is not the thing it describes. Whenever the map is confused with the territory, a 'semantic disturbance' is set up in the organism. The disturbance continues until the limitation of the map is recognized.
— Alfred Korzybski
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“Opposites attract.”

Like attracts unlike; energy and actions often attract their “opposites.”
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Altar versus alter

Any questions?

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Leap

Just people enjoying themselves

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“Wait For It...The Mongols!: Crash Course World History #17”

“In which John Green teaches you, at long last, about the most exceptional bunch of empire-building nomads in the history of the world, the Mongols! How did the Mongols go from being a relatively small band of herders who occasionally engaged in some light hunting-gathering to being one of the most formidable fighting forces in the world? It turns out Genghis Khan was a pretty big part of it, but you probably already knew that. The more interesting questions might be, what kind of rulers were they, and what effect did their empire have on the world we know today? Find out, as John FINALLY teaches you about the Mongols.”

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Greet the sunrise

I also greet the sunrise every day that I can. That's something I learned from my Baptist deacon grandfather. Granted, I do it with a bit more ceremony than he ever did. He was content to do it from the front porch with a cup of coffee.

Oh, and I've been known to dance naked in the light of a full Moon.

You can't embarrass me for following rites and rituals, anymore than you can embarrass a Christian for taking communion or an orthodox Jew for keeping kosher. My faith isn't my politics, and it doesn't matter to me what others think about it. It's between me and the Divine.
— NeoWayland
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“Fairies, Aliens and Demons - Common Evolving Archetypes”

tip of the hat to Chas Clifton

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Between the moments

Between one and the next.

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“Mansa Musa and Islam in Africa: Crash Course World History #16”

“In which John Green teaches you about Sub-Saharan Africa! So, what exactly was going on there? It turns out, it was a lot of trade, converting to Islam, visits from Ibn Battuta, trade, beautiful women, trade, some impressive architecture, and several empires. John not only cover the the West African Malian Empire, which is the one Mansa Musa ruled, but he discusses the Ghana Empire, and even gets over to East Africa as well to discuss the trade-based city-states of Mogadishu, Mombasa, and Zanzibar. In addition to all this, John considers emigrating to Canada.”

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Dancing naked

The trouble with dancing naked is that not everything stops when the music does.
— The Minnions
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See beyond

The deeper the passion, the harder it is to see beyond our expectations.
— NeoWayland, pedestal problem
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Very little honor

Because there is very little honor left in American life, there is a certain built-in tendency to destroy masculinity in American men.
— Norman Mailer
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❝What’s in a name? — Everything!❞

Knowing the complete and true name of an object, being or process gives one complete control over it.
— Isaac Bonewits, The Laws of Magic, The Law of Names

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❝Nudity is a problem for Americans.❞

Nudity is a problem for Americans. It disrupts our social exchange.
— Eric Fischl
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Gibbs Rule #5

You don't waste good.

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Sunfell Tech Mage Rede Nine Words Serve The Tech Mage Best Keep What Works Fix What’s Broke Ditch The Rest

A narrow slice of life, but now and again pondering American neopaganism, modern adult pagans & the World.

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